LEAN TO SHED

LEAN TO SHED

LEAN TO SHED

LEAN TO SHED GENERAL INFORMATION

So you’ve decided to either build or buy a lean to shed. I’ve built two different types of lean to sheds and we’ve really grown to love them. We have really benefited from the added storage they’ve provided which we simply did’nt have before. I’ve decided to share some of my insights with you in the hopes that you’ll be armed with more information as to what type of lean to shed to build, and if you’ll do the work yourself or hire it out.

After researching how to build a lean to, I’ve accumulated a list of links on how to build a lean to shed. I also compiled a list of reputable companies that sell lean to sheds or lean to shed kits — the links are posted on the left side of the page. "Amazon" is also included — it has a huge selection of affordable books on the subject. I’ll keep updating the list of links as I find more.

I also found some great video footage about building lean to sheds from "YouTube." These are also included to the left. I was only able to download a few "YouTube" videos, but there are dozens more about lean to shed construction on their website.

Pictured above is our attached lean to — built against the side of an outbuilding. For this shed, I used as much free or recycled lumber as I could find, but a fair amount of it is new wood. More construction pictures and details are further down the page.

IDEAS FOR BUILDING A LEAN TO SHED

This picture (left) is of our free standing lean to wood shed. More pictures of the lean to (ie. sides, floor etc.) are a bit further down in the page. If you’re looking to save money on building costs, you may need to get creative and try to make use of used wood and other supplies (nails, screws, roofing etc.)

I was able to find a fair amount of free lumber from "Craigslist"www.craigslist.com). I also used some left over lumber I had from a previous project. We have a local business in our area (Portland, OR) called "The Rebuilding Center," which sells used/recycled lumber and other building materials — I was also able to get a lot of wood here. I even managed to find some new roll roofing at this store, along with a bucket of tar for securing it onto the roof. Whatever else I needed, I purchased at Home Depot or Lowes.

Because the free standing lean to will be used for storing firewood, I placed pallets on the ground since they keep the wood off the ground and allow for great air movement to aid in drying out or seasoning the firewood. I got all of the pallets for free from "Craigslist." There are usually plenty of businesses wanting to get rid of them, so I’m sure you’ll have no problems finding any if you decide you’d like to get some. I found listings for free pallets nearly every day.

SHED BUILDING SUPPLIES

The shed building supplies you use will depend on what the shed will be used for. For example — I used corrugated metal for the sides and roofing on my attached lean to since it is located in our pasture and used for livestock.

Had I wanted to build a similar lean to structure against our house, I would have been more particular about the building materials chosen. I would have opted for asphalt shingles which matched the shingles on our home. The sides would have been constructed of wood and finished with trim etc.

For my lean to wood storage shed, I was also able to use a mix of new and "used" building materials. The rebuilding store had used nails, screws, siding, flashing, roofing tar, and some 2×4’s. It also had unused roll roofing — a definite bonus! Although these supplies were used, they worked nicely for this shed.

For the supports, I had to buy new 4"x4"x8′ pressure treated posts — if you happen to find these at a recycled wood business, you’re definitely in luck! I buried the posts around 2 feet deep, and used a level to make sure they were straight. I bought 6 sheets of plywood, 4 for the roof, and 1 for each side. This was the extent of my "new" lumber.

It takes creativity to use second hand building materials at times — the wood can be cut in odd lenghts, full of nails etc. But in the end, the amount of money saved can make it all worthwhile! I found that I could build a bigger lean to shed by building with used materials since they didn’t cost as much. The same lean to wood storage shed would have easily doubled in price had I used all new materials. You’ll have to decide for yourself what size shed will suit your needs, and how much you can budget for it.

LEAN TO SHED PLANS

When researching the project, I discovered that were a lot of plans available online. However, I also found there were very few FREE plans available. But I managed to find a couple of plans with some good photos and basic dimensions for me to follow — and then I was off to work. If you check out the link for the FREE lean to shed, you’ll see some resemblance to my free standing lean to.

I found a bunch of plans available to buy online and found them to be quite reasonable — generally ranging from around $5.00 to $50.00, depending on how elaborate a lean to you’re planning to build. With the money you’ll save by not paying a contractor to do the work, it may be well worth it!

LIVESTOCK LEAN TO SHED

Livestock lean to sheds provide a more cost effective means of housing for horses, cattle, goats, sheep etc. The animals won’t be particularly picky about what it looks like and would certainly appreciate being out of the rain, snow, and intense summer sun — and because it is open on one side, it always has plenty of air circulating through it. Animals confined to enclosed barns or sheds may not have adequate ventilation, which can lead to various illnesses. A great example of a shed for livestock is a Loafing shed.

Loafing sheds are suited for livestock, usually horses or cattle. But smaller loafing sheds are built for housing smaller animals such as Llamas, goats, sheep etc. For a link to a great loafing shed Click Here! Just click on the "barns" icon, and then look for the loafing shed. This plan looks like it would be great for a horse shed, and something not overly complicated to build! If I had located this plan before I built my attached lean to — I may have opted for this design instead.

LEAN TO SHED BUILDING MATERIALS

For this lean to shed (above), I bought most of the building materials at Lowes and Home Depot and spent about $200. I usually like to look around for used or recycled wood or other building materials to cut costs, and because it’s more environmentally friendly. It basically consists of corrugated metal sheets for the roof and sides, along with pressure treated 4x4x10 posts and 2×4’s of various lengths. It took me a couple of days to build — and I found the corrugated metal was relatively easy to assemble.

I was able to attach it to the cement wall with long bolts from Home Depot. I had to buy a drill bit made for drilling through concrete too, along with some special glue that adhered to both the metal and concrete. I cannot recall the type or brand of adhesive I purchased, but the folks at the box stores could help you find a suitable product. I secured the long board to the concrete shed first and let the adhesive set overnight before assembling the rest of it. Below are two pictures of the support board bolted into the concrete wall — better demonstrating what I’ve been talking about.

LEAN TO SHED

LEAN TO SHED GENERAL INFORMATION

So you’ve decided to either build or buy a lean to shed. I’ve built two different types of lean to sheds and we’ve really grown to love them. We have really benefited from the added storage they’ve provided which we simply did’nt have before. I’ve decided to share some of my insights with you in the hopes that you’ll be armed with more information as to what type of lean to shed to build, and if you’ll do the work yourself or hire it out.

After researching how to build a lean to, I’ve accumulated a list of links on how to build a lean to shed. I also compiled a list of reputable companies that sell lean to sheds or lean to shed kits — the links are posted on the left side of the page. "Amazon" is also included — it has a huge selection of affordable books on the subject. I’ll keep updating the list of links as I find more.

I also found some great video footage about building lean to sheds from "YouTube." These are also included to the left. I was only able to download a few "YouTube" videos, but there are dozens more about lean to shed construction on their website.

Pictured above is our attached lean to — built against the side of an outbuilding. For this shed, I used as much free or recycled lumber as I could find, but a fair amount of it is new wood. More construction pictures and details are further down the page.

IDEAS FOR BUILDING A LEAN TO SHED

This picture (left) is of our free standing lean to wood shed. More pictures of the lean to (ie. sides, floor etc.) are a bit further down in the page. If you’re looking to save money on building costs, you may need to get creative and try to make use of used wood and other supplies (nails, screws, roofing etc.)

LEAN TO SHED

I was able to find a fair amount of free lumber from "Craigslist"www.craigslist.com). I also used some left over lumber I had from a previous project. We have a local business in our area (Portland, OR) called "The Rebuilding Center," which sells used/recycled lumber and other building materials — I was also able to get a lot of wood here. I even managed to find some new roll roofing at this store, along with a bucket of tar for securing it onto the roof. Whatever else I needed, I purchased at Home Depot or Lowes.

Because the free standing lean to will be used for storing firewood, I placed pallets on the ground since they keep the wood off the ground and allow for great air movement to aid in drying out or seasoning the firewood. I got all of the pallets for free from "Craigslist." There are usually plenty of businesses wanting to get rid of them, so I’m sure you’ll have no problems finding any if you decide you’d like to get some. I found listings for free pallets nearly every day.

SHED BUILDING SUPPLIES

The shed building supplies you use will depend on what the shed will be used for. For example — I used corrugated metal for the sides and roofing on my attached lean to since it is located in our pasture and used for livestock.

Had I wanted to build a similar lean to structure against our house, I would have been more particular about the building materials chosen. I would have opted for asphalt shingles which matched the shingles on our home. The sides would have been constructed of wood and finished with trim etc.

For my lean to wood storage shed, I was also able to use a mix of new and "used" building materials. The rebuilding store had used nails, screws, siding, flashing, roofing tar, and some 2×4’s. It also had unused roll roofing — a definite bonus! Although these supplies were used, they worked nicely for this shed.

For the supports, I had to buy new 4"x4"x8′ pressure treated posts — if you happen to find these at a recycled wood business, you’re definitely in luck! I buried the posts around 2 feet deep, and used a level to make sure they were straight. I bought 6 sheets of plywood, 4 for the roof, and 1 for each side. This was the extent of my "new" lumber.

It takes creativity to use second hand building materials at times — the wood can be cut in odd lenghts, full of nails etc. But in the end, the amount of money saved can make it all worthwhile! I found that I could build a bigger lean to shed by building with used materials since they didn’t cost as much. The same lean to wood storage shed would have easily doubled in price had I used all new materials. You’ll have to decide for yourself what size shed will suit your needs, and how much you can budget for it.

LEAN TO SHED PLANS

When researching the project, I discovered that were a lot of plans available online. However, I also found there were very few FREE plans available. But I managed to find a couple of plans with some good photos and basic dimensions for me to follow — and then I was off to work. If you check out the link for the FREE lean to shed, you’ll see some resemblance to my free standing lean to.

I found a bunch of plans available to buy online and found them to be quite reasonable — generally ranging from around $5.00 to $50.00, depending on how elaborate a lean to you’re planning to build. With the money you’ll save by not paying a contractor to do the work, it may be well worth it!

LIVESTOCK LEAN TO SHED

Livestock lean to sheds provide a more cost effective means of housing for horses, cattle, goats, sheep etc. The animals won’t be particularly picky about what it looks like and would certainly appreciate being out of the rain, snow, and intense summer sun — and because it is open on one side, it always has plenty of air circulating through it. Animals confined to enclosed barns or sheds may not have adequate ventilation, which can lead to various illnesses. A great example of a shed for livestock is a Loafing shed.

Loafing sheds are suited for livestock, usually horses or cattle. But smaller loafing sheds are built for housing smaller animals such as Llamas, goats, sheep etc. For a link to a great loafing shed Click Here! Just click on the "barns" icon, and then look for the loafing shed. This plan looks like it would be great for a horse shed, and something not overly complicated to build! If I had located this plan before I built my attached lean to — I may have opted for this design instead.

LEAN TO SHED BUILDING MATERIALS

For this lean to shed (above), I bought most of the building materials at Lowes and Home Depot and spent about $200. I usually like to look around for used or recycled wood or other building materials to cut costs, and because it’s more environmentally friendly. It basically consists of corrugated metal sheets for the roof and sides, along with pressure treated 4x4x10 posts and 2×4’s of various lengths. It took me a couple of days to build — and I found the corrugated metal was relatively easy to assemble.

I was able to attach it to the cement wall with long bolts from Home Depot. I had to buy a drill bit made for drilling through concrete too, along with some special glue that adhered to both the metal and concrete. I cannot recall the type or brand of adhesive I purchased, but the folks at the box stores could help you find a suitable product. I secured the long board to the concrete shed first and let the adhesive set overnight before assembling the rest of it. Below are two pictures of the support board bolted into the concrete wall — better demonstrating what I’ve been talking about.


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