Roof Damage, Roofing Claims and Roof Replacement

Roof Damage, Roofing Claims and Roof Replacement

There are many different types of roofing systems that people have on their homes. A roof can range from tile to cedar, to asphalt to slate and back again.

All of these types of roofing systems can sustain damage from storms.

Slate and tile roofing is considered to be among the best type of roofing shingles for residential roofing. They tend to resist hail damage and their lifetime is among the highest in the industry with slate sometimes lasting 100 years or more.

Cedar roofing sustains "hits and splits" from hailstones and if the latter is as plentiful as the former, it is considered damaged. 1.5 to 2.5 inches and larger may cause damage to this type of roof.

Asphalt shingles are among the most popular choice of current homeowners across the country with warranties ranging from 25 years to 50 years. Hail that is 1 inch in diameter can damage the 25 year shingle but it generally requires larger hail to damage the higher rated (thicker) asphalt shingles.

Wind can cause damage to all these types of roofing systems and their susceptibilities to wind are similar to that of how hail affects them with the "higher end" roofing like slate, tile and cedar being more resistant, performing better and lasting longer.

No matter what type of roofing system you have, your roof may sustain damage at some point. If you submit a claim for your roof and are approved for the claim, your damages will often be paid for in one of four ways.

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If your damage is minimal. your approval may only be for a "repair" or a roof patch. This is typically the smallest roof approval that you can receive and the repairs may require the replacement of a few shingles or the repairing of some faulty flashing. In either case, the repairs should not cost very much and generally will not take very long.

If your approval is larger than a repair yet still only provides to cover less than half of the total roofing system, this is considered a "partial"  approval. As with the repair, most contractors will only be likely to perform the repairs within the scope of the partial approval. If you were to get more work performed than what your insurance company allows for, you would have to pay the difference.

Another common roofing approval is what is known as a "half" approval. Many roofing systems can be "divided" into 2 major opposite facing slopes. Sometimes certain storms may only physically damage one half of the roof. Since most roofing systems, including larger and more complicated residential structures, can be visually and mathematically divided in half, it sometimes makes sense that only one half of a certain roof will be approved.

If you receive a half approval for a high end roof like sate, tile or cedar, you may simply have the damaged half replaced and hope that it matches enough to your liking or you could pay a contractor the difference which would usually be (you guessed it) about double your approval amount. Many contractors will offer a discount of the "out of pocket" portion of the job. Still, your personal expense would be a substantial percentage of the entire project cost.

If you currently have asphalt shingles and you receive a half approval, you can also pay the difference to have your entire roof replaced or you may be able to opt for a "layover" roof. A layover roof is a roof that is installed over or on top of your existing shingles. Most contractors can perform a layover roofing job for the same price that an insurance company pays for a half roof.

The benefit of the layover, of course, is that you get all of the aesthetics of a compete roof replacement. All anyone will see are all of the new shingles. But, there are some things you should know.

In most states, you are only allowed to perform one layover, meaning that only a total of 2 layers is ever allowed at one time. Also, your current shingle needs to be what is commonly called a "3-Tab" or a "flat" roof. Lastly, some roofing manufacturers’ warranties are voided if their shingle is installed in a layover fashion. So, if you receive a half roof approval and you currently have only one layer of a flat asphalt shingle, you may have some things to think about.

The only other type of major roofing approval outcomes is that of a "full" roof or complete replacement. Most contractors will perform all of the approved roofing work within the insurance approval allowance. Also, because a complete roof replacement tends to be a larger job, some contractors are willing to work with you in terms of handling your deductible and or performing small extras for minimal extra costs.

If you receive an approval that is less than what you think is fair or appropriate, you can often submit for a "re-decision" or "re-inspection." So, before you try to do a lot with a little, make sure that the little that you got is all you’re gonna get.

Most qualified restoration contractors will be able to tell you if more repairs are required or recommended that may be beyond the scope of insurance approval. This is why it is usually a good idea to have an experienced insurance restoration contractor on your side from as early on in the claims process as possible. Sometimes the best person to ask is the person that happens to specialize in the restoration work that you happen to be in need of.

There are many different types of roofing systems that people have on their homes. A roof can range from tile to cedar, to asphalt to slate and back again.

All of these types of roofing systems can sustain damage from storms.

Slate and tile roofing is considered to be among the best type of roofing shingles for residential roofing. They tend to resist hail damage and their lifetime is among the highest in the industry with slate sometimes lasting 100 years or more.

Cedar roofing sustains "hits and splits" from hailstones and if the latter is as plentiful as the former, it is considered damaged. 1.5 to 2.5 inches and larger may cause damage to this type of roof.

Asphalt shingles are among the most popular choice of current homeowners across the country with warranties ranging from 25 years to 50 years. Hail that is 1 inch in diameter can damage the 25 year shingle but it generally requires larger hail to damage the higher rated (thicker) asphalt shingles.

Wind can cause damage to all these types of roofing systems and their susceptibilities to wind are similar to that of how hail affects them with the "higher end" roofing like slate, tile and cedar being more resistant, performing better and lasting longer.

Roof Damage, Roofing Claims and Roof Replacement

No matter what type of roofing system you have, your roof may sustain damage at some point. If you submit a claim for your roof and are approved for the claim, your damages will often be paid for in one of four ways.

Related Articles

If your damage is minimal. your approval may only be for a "repair" or a roof patch. This is typically the smallest roof approval that you can receive and the repairs may require the replacement of a few shingles or the repairing of some faulty flashing. In either case, the repairs should not cost very much and generally will not take very long.

If your approval is larger than a repair yet still only provides to cover less than half of the total roofing system, this is considered a "partial"  approval. As with the repair, most contractors will only be likely to perform the repairs within the scope of the partial approval. If you were to get more work performed than what your insurance company allows for, you would have to pay the difference.

Another common roofing approval is what is known as a "half" approval. Many roofing systems can be "divided" into 2 major opposite facing slopes. Sometimes certain storms may only physically damage one half of the roof. Since most roofing systems, including larger and more complicated residential structures, can be visually and mathematically divided in half, it sometimes makes sense that only one half of a certain roof will be approved.

If you receive a half approval for a high end roof like sate, tile or cedar, you may simply have the damaged half replaced and hope that it matches enough to your liking or you could pay a contractor the difference which would usually be (you guessed it) about double your approval amount. Many contractors will offer a discount of the "out of pocket" portion of the job. Still, your personal expense would be a substantial percentage of the entire project cost.

If you currently have asphalt shingles and you receive a half approval, you can also pay the difference to have your entire roof replaced or you may be able to opt for a "layover" roof. A layover roof is a roof that is installed over or on top of your existing shingles. Most contractors can perform a layover roofing job for the same price that an insurance company pays for a half roof.

The benefit of the layover, of course, is that you get all of the aesthetics of a compete roof replacement. All anyone will see are all of the new shingles. But, there are some things you should know.

In most states, you are only allowed to perform one layover, meaning that only a total of 2 layers is ever allowed at one time. Also, your current shingle needs to be what is commonly called a "3-Tab" or a "flat" roof. Lastly, some roofing manufacturers’ warranties are voided if their shingle is installed in a layover fashion. So, if you receive a half roof approval and you currently have only one layer of a flat asphalt shingle, you may have some things to think about.

The only other type of major roofing approval outcomes is that of a "full" roof or complete replacement. Most contractors will perform all of the approved roofing work within the insurance approval allowance. Also, because a complete roof replacement tends to be a larger job, some contractors are willing to work with you in terms of handling your deductible and or performing small extras for minimal extra costs.

If you receive an approval that is less than what you think is fair or appropriate, you can often submit for a "re-decision" or "re-inspection." So, before you try to do a lot with a little, make sure that the little that you got is all you’re gonna get.

Most qualified restoration contractors will be able to tell you if more repairs are required or recommended that may be beyond the scope of insurance approval. This is why it is usually a good idea to have an experienced insurance restoration contractor on your side from as early on in the claims process as possible. Sometimes the best person to ask is the person that happens to specialize in the restoration work that you happen to be in need of.


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