Composite Roof — Composite Roof Shingles, roof shingles, Composite shingles

Composite Roof - Composite Roof Shingles, roof shingles, Composite shingles

3. 3-tab Composite Shingles

3-tab composite shingles are the most popular type of composite roof shingles sold in the United States. This type of shingle is used in both new construction, and when an old roof is replaced by the building owner. 3-tab shingles is the cheapest type of composite roof shingles available on the market today, and typically come with a 20-year warranty. This warranty applies only to the shingles themselves, and not the installation or parts used by the installer. 3-tab composite shingles are available in a number of colors, and are easy to install.

4. Laminated Composite Shingles

Laminated composite shingles are the second most popular type of composite shingles available on the market. While they are a little more expensive than the 3-tab variety, they typically last longer, and have more varieties available. Laminated shingles are created in the same manner as other types of shingles, but also include an additional layer of laminated material on the top of the shingle. This creates a more decorative look to the shingle, as well as adding more protection.

5. Hail Resistant Composite Shingles

Hail resistant composite shingles are one of the less popular options for homeowners. This type of shingle is popular in areas with a large amount of rain and hail, such as tropical locations, or the Midwest where extreme rainstorms are often highlighted by tornados. Hail resistant shingles were also used during the rebuilding process in Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina hit. This type of shingle is very similar to the other types of composite shingles except that they are made with a different type of asphalt. This asphalt is made with specific materials to increase the UV protection and also something known as elastifiers.

6. Composite Shingle Replications

Composite shingle replications are another option for homeowners. Though this type of composite roof shingle only accounts for a small percentage of all shingles sold, the numbers are rapidly growing every year. These may also be known as specialty shingles because they can be made to look like any type of roofing material. These shingles are made to look exactly like the different types of roofing materials, yet they are significantly less expensive. Composite shingle replications are still made of asphalt combined with other materials, but take on a much different appearance. The warranty that is given on shingle replications vary depending on the style chosen, yet 30 years is the most popular choice.

7. Guarantees of a Composite Roof

The guarantees of a composite roof depend on the installer who completes the process. A reputable roofer will complete the work themselves, and offer a guarantee on their work. Homeowners should also have the option of buying an extended warranty to protect the work long into the future. As a marketing ploy, some companies have begun offering a 20 year or 30 year guarantee to new customers. This guarantee often does not cover damage from natural elements, but does cover any error from the installer. That means that if a thunderstorm or hail storm knocks several shingles from the roof, the homeowner will need to pay to have those shingles replaced themselves. If, however the shingles come loose because they were not properly installed, the company will make those changes and replace the shingles.

8. Installation of a Composite Roof

The first step in installing a composite roof is to find a reputable and authorized installation company. This can be done by calling the home insurance company, which may have experience in the process, and have a company they are willing to recommend. Homeowners should also consider asking for recommendations from family and friends. Once a company has been found, the homeowner can contact the Better Business Bureau to ensure that the company has a strong background of completing work as promised. The installer will then make a visit to the home to make an initial assessment of the work to be completed. He or she will also bring along a book of samples that includes the shingles they have access to, or can order for the job.

3. 3-tab Composite Shingles

3-tab composite shingles are the most popular type of composite roof shingles sold in the United States. This type of shingle is used in both new construction, and when an old roof is replaced by the building owner. 3-tab shingles is the cheapest type of composite roof shingles available on the market today, and typically come with a 20-year warranty. This warranty applies only to the shingles themselves, and not the installation or parts used by the installer. 3-tab composite shingles are available in a number of colors, and are easy to install.

4. Laminated Composite Shingles

Laminated composite shingles are the second most popular type of composite shingles available on the market. While they are a little more expensive than the 3-tab variety, they typically last longer, and have more varieties available. Laminated shingles are created in the same manner as other types of shingles, but also include an additional layer of laminated material on the top of the shingle. This creates a more decorative look to the shingle, as well as adding more protection.

5. Hail Resistant Composite Shingles

Hail resistant composite shingles are one of the less popular options for homeowners. This type of shingle is popular in areas with a large amount of rain and hail, such as tropical locations, or the Midwest where extreme rainstorms are often highlighted by tornados. Hail resistant shingles were also used during the rebuilding process in Louisiana after Hurricane Katrina hit. This type of shingle is very similar to the other types of composite shingles except that they are made with a different type of asphalt. This asphalt is made with specific materials to increase the UV protection and also something known as elastifiers.

6. Composite Shingle Replications

Composite shingle replications are another option for homeowners. Though this type of composite roof shingle only accounts for a small percentage of all shingles sold, the numbers are rapidly growing every year. These may also be known as specialty shingles because they can be made to look like any type of roofing material. These shingles are made to look exactly like the different types of roofing materials, yet they are significantly less expensive. Composite shingle replications are still made of asphalt combined with other materials, but take on a much different appearance. The warranty that is given on shingle replications vary depending on the style chosen, yet 30 years is the most popular choice.

7. Guarantees of a Composite Roof

The guarantees of a composite roof depend on the installer who completes the process. A reputable roofer will complete the work themselves, and offer a guarantee on their work. Homeowners should also have the option of buying an extended warranty to protect the work long into the future. As a marketing ploy, some companies have begun offering a 20 year or 30 year guarantee to new customers. This guarantee often does not cover damage from natural elements, but does cover any error from the installer. That means that if a thunderstorm or hail storm knocks several shingles from the roof, the homeowner will need to pay to have those shingles replaced themselves. If, however the shingles come loose because they were not properly installed, the company will make those changes and replace the shingles.

8. Installation of a Composite Roof

The first step in installing a composite roof is to find a reputable and authorized installation company. This can be done by calling the home insurance company, which may have experience in the process, and have a company they are willing to recommend. Homeowners should also consider asking for recommendations from family and friends. Once a company has been found, the homeowner can contact the Better Business Bureau to ensure that the company has a strong background of completing work as promised. The installer will then make a visit to the home to make an initial assessment of the work to be completed. He or she will also bring along a book of samples that includes the shingles they have access to, or can order for the job.


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