-

-

Gutters are not glamorous, but they protect your house from water damage as surely as the roof. Without gutters, water dripping from the roof edge can rot fascia and wood siding, and when it hits the ground, it can undermine the foundation. Both metal and plastic gutter systems are available, in many different styles. If your house has a metal roof, metal gutters will look better than plastic ones. They are also more durable and able to withstand the stress of large quantities of ice and snow falling from the roof.

Find local businesses for

Step 1 Map out the gutter system, planning the locations of downspouts so that they are inconspicuous and so that water will drain away from the house. Measure the total length of gutter you need, and add 10 percent for overlap and waste. Count the number of corner fittings, end caps and hangers, figuring one hanger for every 2 feet of gutter. Measure the lengths of the downspouts, and add 4 feet for each roof to ground span to account for an extension away from the house. Count three elbow fittings for each span of downspout.

Step 2 Mark the slope of the gutter on the fascia on each side of the house, starting at the high point and sloping toward the downspout. Drive a nail through the fascia 1/2 inch below the roof edge at the high point. Measure the distance to the downspout, then add 1/4 inch to the distance from the roof edge for every 10 feet of span; drive another nail. Connect a chalk line to the two nails and snap it to make a line.

Step 3 Assemble the gutters on the ground. Join sections by spreading caulk on one end of each section, overlapping the ends by 2 to 4 inches and riveting them together. Make sections that are 1 inch longer than the fascia, and rivet on an end cap, but wait until the gutter is hung to install corner fittings. Use a hacksaw when you need to cut sections of gutter.

Step 4 Measure the locations for the holes for downspouts. Trace the outline of a downspout tube at each location with a pencil, then set a block of wood underneath the gutter to support it while you drive a chisel through the outline with a hammer. Work a pair of tin snips into the hole made by the chisel, and snip around the outline. Spread caulk around the hole, fit in the downspout tube and rivet it in place.

Step 5 Set each pre-assembled length of gutter along the chalk line marking its slope, and screw the back edge to the fascia and the ends of the rafters with 1 1/2-inch screws. Work L-flashing under the roof covering so that it overlaps the back edge of the gutter, and screw it to the fascia. Then hook hangers onto the front edges of the gutters at 2-foot intervals; screw them to the fascia and, if possible, into the ends of the rafters.

Step 6 Install corner fittings, where needed, by spreading caulk and riveting them on.

Step 7 Slide the uncrimped end of an elbow over each downspout tube to offset the downspout so that it will run down along the siding. Attach it by driving a 3/4-inch sheet metal screw into each side instead of using rivets. That way, it will be easier to remove if you need to clean it. Cut a small section of downspout that reaches the siding, and crimp one end with a sheet metal crimper. Screw it to the elbow, then slide another elbow on the other end so that it faces down, and screw it on.

Step 8 Slide and screw on sections of downspout until you reach a point about 1 foot from the ground. Affix the downspouts to the siding with pre-formed clamps designed for the downspout you are using. Screw these to the siding with 1 1/2-inch screws.

Step 9 Attach an elbow to the outlet of the downspout. Then cut a length of downspout and screw it to the elbow to extend the outlet as far as it needs to go to direct water away from the house.

Gutters are not glamorous, but they protect your house from water damage as surely as the roof. Without gutters, water dripping from the roof edge can rot fascia and wood siding, and when it hits the ground, it can undermine the foundation. Both metal and plastic gutter systems are available, in many different styles. If your house has a metal roof, metal gutters will look better than plastic ones. They are also more durable and able to withstand the stress of large quantities of ice and snow falling from the roof.

Find local businesses for

Step 1 Map out the gutter system, planning the locations of downspouts so that they are inconspicuous and so that water will drain away from the house. Measure the total length of gutter you need, and add 10 percent for overlap and waste. Count the number of corner fittings, end caps and hangers, figuring one hanger for every 2 feet of gutter. Measure the lengths of the downspouts, and add 4 feet for each roof to ground span to account for an extension away from the house. Count three elbow fittings for each span of downspout.

-

Step 2 Mark the slope of the gutter on the fascia on each side of the house, starting at the high point and sloping toward the downspout. Drive a nail through the fascia 1/2 inch below the roof edge at the high point. Measure the distance to the downspout, then add 1/4 inch to the distance from the roof edge for every 10 feet of span; drive another nail. Connect a chalk line to the two nails and snap it to make a line.

Step 3 Assemble the gutters on the ground. Join sections by spreading caulk on one end of each section, overlapping the ends by 2 to 4 inches and riveting them together. Make sections that are 1 inch longer than the fascia, and rivet on an end cap, but wait until the gutter is hung to install corner fittings. Use a hacksaw when you need to cut sections of gutter.

Step 4 Measure the locations for the holes for downspouts. Trace the outline of a downspout tube at each location with a pencil, then set a block of wood underneath the gutter to support it while you drive a chisel through the outline with a hammer. Work a pair of tin snips into the hole made by the chisel, and snip around the outline. Spread caulk around the hole, fit in the downspout tube and rivet it in place.

Step 5 Set each pre-assembled length of gutter along the chalk line marking its slope, and screw the back edge to the fascia and the ends of the rafters with 1 1/2-inch screws. Work L-flashing under the roof covering so that it overlaps the back edge of the gutter, and screw it to the fascia. Then hook hangers onto the front edges of the gutters at 2-foot intervals; screw them to the fascia and, if possible, into the ends of the rafters.

Step 6 Install corner fittings, where needed, by spreading caulk and riveting them on.

Step 7 Slide the uncrimped end of an elbow over each downspout tube to offset the downspout so that it will run down along the siding. Attach it by driving a 3/4-inch sheet metal screw into each side instead of using rivets. That way, it will be easier to remove if you need to clean it. Cut a small section of downspout that reaches the siding, and crimp one end with a sheet metal crimper. Screw it to the elbow, then slide another elbow on the other end so that it faces down, and screw it on.

Step 8 Slide and screw on sections of downspout until you reach a point about 1 foot from the ground. Affix the downspouts to the siding with pre-formed clamps designed for the downspout you are using. Screw these to the siding with 1 1/2-inch screws.

Step 9 Attach an elbow to the outlet of the downspout. Then cut a length of downspout and screw it to the elbow to extend the outlet as far as it needs to go to direct water away from the house.


Leave a Reply