University of Derby, Buxton — St Johns Road, Buxton — domes Flickr — Photo Sharing!

A look around Buxton in Derbyshire on St John’s Road.

University of Derby, Buxton

Donimating the Buxton skyline is the dome of the Devonshire Campus of Derby University. The Dome, with a circumference of 46 metres, built by Robert Rippon Duke in 1882 for the Royal Devonshire Hospital, sits on the original building by John Carr which housed the horses and servants of the guests of the Crescent hotels. The general public are welcome to use the many facilities, including restaurant, coffee shop, hair salon, and holistic Spa.

II*

Stables to the Crescent, now hospital. 1785-90, by John Carr,

for the 5th Duke of Devonshire, converted 1859, by Henry

Currey, domes and clock tower added 1880-81 by Robert Ripon

Duke, C20 alterations and additions. Ashlar gritstone with

ashlar dressings, slate roof and copper domes.

PLAN: Square with canted corners and circular courtyard.

EXTERIOR: 2 storeys with 11 windows to each front and 3

windows to each corner front. Plinth, ground floor impost

band, dentilated eaves cornice.

East, entrance front, has slightly projecting 3 window centre

with broad pediment. Central round headed doorway with double

doors and fanlight, flanked by single round headed windows,

with above three 9-pane square windows, flanking 4 window

wings have round headed glazing bar window set in plain outer

arches, with four 9-pane windows above. Chamfered corners each

have large central round headed windows flanked by small

windows all in plain round headed arches. All fronts

identical, except for south front which has projecting 3 bay

centre with single bay returns. Pedimented front has a former

entrance in raised moulded surround with inscription to frieze

recording the munificent charity of Wm Spencer, 6th Duke of

Devonshire in allowing the building to be converted in 1858.

The urn surmounting the pediment is believed to be by Tom

Wentworth of Doncaster and originally crowned the Well House

(demolished) of 1782 by J Carr.

East front topped by square clock tower with 2 round headed

louvred bell openings to each face of first stage flanked by

pairs of Tuscan Doric pilasters. Above clock to each face

flanked by pilasters topped by pediments. Above a square

ribbed lead dome with iron weather vane. Over each chamfered

corner a square wooden lantern with 3 blank panels to each

face, the central one topped by a pediment, and above an

octagonal copper dome with finial. Central slated dome has

circular lantern topped with small copper cupola.

North front largely obscured by later alterations and

additions.

INTERIOR: central circular hall 180 feet in diameter with a

fine Tuscan Doric colonnade of 48 columns, each 28 feet high,

supporting an entablature with frieze bearing the inscription:

ONE HALF OF THIS BUILDING WAS GIVEN TO THE USE OF THE POOR BY

WILLIAM SPENCER CAVENDISH SIXTH DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE IN THE YEAR

1859 AND CONVEYED TO TRUSTEES AS THE DEVONSHIRE HOSPITAL

TOGETHER WITH THE PLEASURE GROUNDS BY WILLIAM CAVENDISH 7TH

DUKE OF DEVONSHIRE IN THE YEAR 1868. THE REMAINDER OF THE

BUILDING WAS OBTAINED IN THE YEAR 1878 AND THE WHOLE WAS

INTERNALLY RECONSTRUCTED BY THE GOVERNORS OF THE COTTON

DISTRICTS CONVALESCENT FUND IN THE YEAR 1881. This colonnade

GV II

Bath accommodation, now hospital addition to Devonshire Royal

Hospital. 1914, altered late C20. Ashlar gritstone with ashlar

dressings and iron balustrade. Lead and part glazed flat roof.

STYLE: Baroque Revival.

EXTERIOR: single storey. Symmetrical 13-window front arranged

1:4:1:4:1 under stone parapet with iron balustrading. Central

entrance has rusticated projecting porch with 3 round arches,

each concave with prominent keystone topped with segmental

pediment and leaded segmental roof. Either side a small oval

window in moulded surround with keystones. Beyond 4 windows in

moulded surrounds with key blocks and C20 casements. Beyond

slightly projecting outer wings with similar single windows

topped with double keystones and pediments.

Left and right returns of 2 windows. Rear: building utilises

ground slope- stone walls and iron rails to rear.

INTERIOR: limited access suggests central corridor with

This text is a legacy record and has not been updated since the building was originally listed. Details of the building may have changed in the intervening time. You should not rely on this listing as an accurate description of the building.

Source: English Heritage

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