New Tile Roof Installation Guidelines Recommended in Florida; Homeowners Facing Hurricane Roof

New Tile Roof Installation Guidelines Recommended in Florida; Homeowners Facing Hurricane Roof

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CHICAGO — After Florida’s relentless 2004 hurricane season, the tile roofing industry surveyed the damage to tile roofs and found one recurring problem. "Hip and ridge" tiles, those tiles that trim the edges of the roof, were likely to be missing or damaged, even on newer homes and on homes that were located further inland where wind speeds were considerably less. Improper installation was primarily to blame.

Early indications from South Florida are that Hurricane Wilma has inflicted, on a smaller scale, similar roof damage to what was seen last year. In areas where wind speeds topped 100 miles per hour, hip and ridge tiles are missing or damaged.

New Tile Roof Installation Guidelines Recommended in Florida; Homeowners Facing Hurricane Roof

In response to last year’s storms, the Tile Roofing Institute (TRI) and the Florida Roofing, Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractors Association (FRSA) worked together to create an extensive set of guidelines for hip and ridge tile attachment. The new instructions, intended to strengthen and clarify current installation procedures, were officially adopted into the Florida Building Code November 1, 2005.

In surveys of 2004 hurricane damage, TRI and FRSA compared tile roofs installed before and after Florida’s 1997 building code revisions. As expected, tile roofs installed after 1997 weathered the storms much better — with this one exception. "We realized more had to be done to address hip and ridge tile attachments," explains Rick Olson, technical director for TRI. "In the past, trim tiles have been treated as decorative accessories. As a result, they were not adequately addressed and were susceptible to uplift forces from high winds."

To assist tile roof owners with hurricane repair efforts, TRI is offering a frequently asked questions (FAQ) guide to tile roof repair. The guide provides advice related to roof damage assessment, safety precautions, contractor selection criteria and repair material considerations. The guide can be obtained online at www.tileroofing.org.

Contractors who wish to download a copy of the new hip and ridge guidelines can visit www.tileroofing.org/hipandridge.

About the Tile Roofing Institute (TRI)

TRI is a non-profit trade association and membership is open to all those involved in the production, distribution and installation of clay and concrete tile roof systems. TRI manufacturer members produce 95 percent of the tile roofing installed in North America, and actively work with research and testing organizations and local code bodies to improve the quality, durability and affordability of tile roof systems. For more information, visit www.tileroofing.org.

About the Florida Roofing, Sheet Metal and Air Conditioning Contractor’s Association (FRSA)

FRSA is an 83-year-old trade association of roofing, sheet metal and air conditioning contractors and industry-related companies including manufacturers, suppliers and roofing consultants. The association seeks to improve the quality of the industries it represents through research, education and certification. For information, visit www.floridaroof.com.


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